Let's Talk About the Boteros: Law, Memory, and the Torture Memos at Berkeley Law
Apr
18
12:10 PM12:10

Let's Talk About the Boteros: Law, Memory, and the Torture Memos at Berkeley Law

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 107 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

What parts of their uncomfortable associations should universities remember, and how? Around the world, institutions of higher learning are confronting what to do with symbols of their ties to slavery, colonialism, racism, and other projects antithetical to their values. For years, Berkeley Law has faced protests for its employment of Professor John Yoo, a principal author of the “Torture Memos” of the Bush Administration. The school’s exhibit of paintings by Fernando Botero of prisoner abuse by US soldiers at Abu Ghraib has communicated an institutional rebuke to the decision of the United States to rewrite the foundational norms of the rule of law in the pursuit of national security after 9/11.

However, the school is considering removing the paintings, which raises questions of memory heuristics: why the paintings are there at all, what they communicate about the past, and whether the past is worthy of commemoration. The Berkeley case offers insights into how and why debates about symbolic representations are contested moments aimed to shape institutional identity and values.

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Withholding Protection
Apr
18
12:10 PM12:10

Withholding Protection

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 546 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In June 2018, President Trump wrote a pair of tweets en route to his golf course, calling for "no judges; no court cases" at our border and swift deportation of immigrants, essentially without due process. While immigrant advocates were quick to explain the myriad constitutional problems with this proposal, elements of Trump's dream are already a reality.

Professor Lindsay M. Harris, Assistant Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Immigration and Human Rights Clinic at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law, will discuss how a single Customs and Border Protection officer can short-circuit the checks and balances prescribed by U.S. and international law to protect refugees from being returned to harm, and cast a long shadow over a future, meritorious asylum claim. She will examine the disastrous interplay between two "speed deportation" processes - expedited removal and reinstatement of removal - insufficient safeguards that leave refugee screening at our borders in the shadows, and the absence of judicial review. Professor Harris will also explore, as an immediate first step to implement the humanitarian protections enshrined in law, the merits and risks of using readily available technology - more specifically, the use of Body Worn Cameras by Customs and Border Protection officers conducting screenings of potential refugees at the border.

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The Human Rights Status in Catalonia
Apr
17
12:10 PM12:10

The Human Rights Status in Catalonia

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 102B (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Now a year and a half removed from Catalonia’s independence referendum on October 1, 2017 (declared illegal by Spain’s Constitutional Court), the Catalan Ombudsman Rafael Ribó believes it is important to reflect critically on the Spanish state’s political and legal reaction to those events as it pertains to fundamental rights. As part of this effort, Mr. Ribó’s office recently published three extensive reports on the issues, including the violence perpetrated by security forces during the referendum, and the subsequent concerns about proscription of rights, such as expression, assembly, and the rights to political participation and representation.

Join Rafael Ribó, the Catalan Ombudsman and European President of the International Ombudsman Institute, for a timely discussion of people’s rights to political participation and a fair trial in contemporary democracy.

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CSIL Private Sector Career Symposium
Apr
17
12:10 PM12:10

CSIL Private Sector Career Symposium

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 102A (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This panel is designed to introduce students to the various career options in international law and to get them thinking about how to tend up in some of those positions.

Speakers include:

  • Karen King | Counsel at Paul, Weiss
    AML, Sanctions, OFAC

  • Todd Crider | Partner at Simpson Thacher
    Co-Head of Latin America Practice

  • David Sabel | Partner at Cleary
    Sovereign Finance and Debt Restructuring

  • Aya Kobori | Counsel at White & Case
    Global Competition and Commercial Litigation

  • Elizabeth Nielsen | Senior Associate at Debevoise
    International Commercial Arbitration and Public International Law

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Terrorism Trials in the UK and US: A Comparative View from Two Judges
Apr
17
12:10 PM12:10

Terrorism Trials in the UK and US: A Comparative View from Two Judges

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Judges from the US and UK and present and former SDNY AUSAs will discuss important issues surrounding terrorism trials, including differences between the US and UK systems, recent discovery reforms, considerations for sentencing, and how national security concerns impact the prosecutions.

HH Michael Topolski, QC recently retired from the bench at the Old Bailey in the United Kingdom, where he specialized in terrorism cases. In private practice, he represented clients in a wide range of complex cases, including terrorism, organized crime, and fraud. He has represented clients at the Hague and in inquests into British troops’ conduct in Iraq.

Lewis Kaplan has been a U.S. District Judge in the Southern District of New York since 1994. He presided over U.S. v. Ahmed Ghailani, the only criminal prosecution in a federal district court of a Guantanamo detainee, who was convicted of an offense involving the bombing of the United States Embassies in Dar-es-Salaam and Nairobi.

Micahel Ferrara is an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Southern District and Co-Chief of the Terrorism and International Narcotics Unit.

Daniel Richman is the Paul J. Kellner Professor of Law at Columbia Law School and a former SDNY prosecutor.

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CSIL Public Sector Career Symposium
Apr
15
12:10 PM12:10

CSIL Public Sector Career Symposium

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall Case Lounge (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

This panel is designed to introduce students to the various career options in international law and get them thinking about how to end up in some of those positions.

Speakers include:

  • Douglass Cassel
    Notre Dame and King & Spalding

  • Param Preet (Pam) Singh
    International Justice Program at HRW

  • Daniel Stewart
    Independent International Legal Advocates

  • Tehtena Mebratu-Tsegaye
    Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment

  • Greg Tzeutschler Regaignon
    Wellspring Philanthropic Fund

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Brexit: Where Does It Stand Today?
Apr
12
12:10 PM12:10

Brexit: Where Does It Stand Today?

CSIL will be hosting a panel event on Brexit this Friday, April 12, at 12:10pm in Jerome Greene Hall 105.  The panelists will discuss the future of Brexit, where it stands, and its implications for international and EU law.  Panelists include Professor Georges Ugeux of Columbia Law School and of SIPA, Professor David Spiro of Columbia's Political Science Department, Kabir Duggal of Arnold & Porter and of Columbia Law School, and British Consul General Antony Phillipson.  

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70 Years After the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Human Rights Today
Apr
3
6:30 PM18:30

70 Years After the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Human Rights Today

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 106 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Seventy years ago, the UN General Assembly unanimously adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Drafted under Chairwoman Eleanor Roosevelt, the UDHR inaugurated the modern international human rights system. This panel discussion explores past accomplishments and future challenges of human rights under the UDHR. The anniversary will also be marked by the unveiling of a bust of Eleanor Roosevelt, gifted to Columbia Law School in recognition of her contribution to human rights.

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The 2018-2019 Events on the Gaza Fence: International Legal Aspects
Mar
26
12:10 PM12:10

The 2018-2019 Events on the Gaza Fence: International Legal Aspects

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Annex (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In the past year, demonstrations have regularly taken place around the fence that separates Gaza and Israel, often leading to clashes between Palestinians and Israeli security forces, resulting in hundreds of Palestinian casualties. The international responses to these events highlights not only conflicting narratives, but also fundamentally opposed legal views: both on the applicable legal regime and on its substance.

Join us to discuss these positions as expressed in various legal fora, and the challenges they pose for the protection of civilians under international humanitarian and human rights law.

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Defining Detention: The Intervention of the European Court of Human Rights in the Detention of Involuntary Migrants
Mar
12
12:10 PM12:10

Defining Detention: The Intervention of the European Court of Human Rights in the Detention of Involuntary Migrants

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 101 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

European states have resorted to “carceral migration control” in response to a migration “crisis,” implementing shortsighted migration policies, entrenching caricatures of migrants as threatening, and emphasizing punitive rather than humanitarian responses. The European Court of Human Rights has since intervened in the prolonged detention of migrants throughout Europe, often using its power to advance the rights of migrants.

In this talk, Professor Anita Sinha, Assistant Professor of Law and the Director of the International Human Rights Law Clinic at American University of Washington College of Law, will interrogate the foundational principles of the European human rights system with respect to migrants. She will then review the Court’s recent decisions regarding the prolonged detention of involuntary migrants illustrate the potential of the European system to extend human rights protections to migrants. More specifically, she will discuss how the European Court of Human Rights has held steadfast to the principle that migration detention is possibly unlawful detention, and that the European Convention on Human Rights prohibits such deprivation of liberty.

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Chutes and Ladders: Nonrefoulement and the Sisyphean Challenge of Seeking Asylum in Hungary
Feb
19
12:10 PM12:10

Chutes and Ladders: Nonrefoulement and the Sisyphean Challenge of Seeking Asylum in Hungary

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 103 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Hungarian asylum law has devolved since the height of the 2015 refugee crisis, and Hungary’s government has violated its obligation not to refoule refugees, which goes against international human rights law. These recent developments in Hungary’s asylum law and policy demonstrate an extraordinary undermining of the refugee rights regime and serve as a case study of how a state can pervert its national laws to shirk its international and regional treaty obligations.

Professor Ashley Binetti Armstrong, the Dash-Muse Teaching Fellow at the Georgetown Human Rights Institute, will evaluate Hungary’s nonrefoulement duty in the context of international and European law, and will more closely focus on Hungary’s noncompliance with those nonrefoulement obligations in designating Serbia as a safe third country. Professor Binetti ultimately will demonstrate that the international community cannot ignore Hungary’s egregious conduct. If there is to be any hope for coordinated efforts to manage refugee crises and uphold the rights of asylum seekers enshrined in the 1951 Refugee Convention and human rights treaties, the international community must study how countries evade the global norm of responsibility sharing and devise solutions to hold rogue states accountable.

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The Use of Force in the 21st Century: Law and Legitimacy
Nov
15
12:10 PM12:10

The Use of Force in the 21st Century: Law and Legitimacy

  • Columbia Law School, William and June Warren Hall 107 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join CSIL for a talk with Patrick Luna, the Second Secretary and Legal Advisor of the Permanent Mission of Brazil to the United Nations, and Alex Moorehead, the Director of the Program on Counterterrorism, Armed Conflict, and Human Rights at Columbia Law School’s Human Rights Institute.

Since 9/11, a small group of states, led by the U.S., have sought to justify their expanded military and counterterrorism operations through stretched interpretations of international law. The prohibition on the use of force in the UN Charter, widely regarded as one of the cornerstones of the post-WWII international order, appears to be under attack. But do all states agree, and who gets to make the law anyway?

This talk will explore recent developments in the law on the use of force and why that matters.

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The United States' Retreat from the Human Rights System
Nov
14
12:10 PM12:10

The United States' Retreat from the Human Rights System

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join CSIL for a lunch with Zeid Ra’ad al Hussein, the former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and Keith Harper, the former U.S. Ambassador and Permanent Representative to the UN Human Rights Council.

In June 2018, the United States announced its withdrawal from the UN Human Rights Council, the primary UN state body established for the protection of human rights. The action accompanied threats or actions to distance the United States from various regional and international human rights institutions. This conversation will consider the United States’ retreat from human rights mechanisms and the implications for the global protection of human rights.

Moderated by Sarah Cleveland, Louis Henkin Professor of Human and Constitutional Rights, Columbia Law School and Vice Chair, United Nations Human Rights Committee.

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Saving the World Trade Organization: How Realistic are the EU's Proposals?
Nov
12
12:10 PM12:10

Saving the World Trade Organization: How Realistic are the EU's Proposals?

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 107 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

In light of the recent disruptions caused by the U.S. within the multilateral trading system, the European Union (EU) has taken up the task of leading reform talks with the view of saving the WTO. The proposals made public by the European Commission at the end of September 2018 focus on three areas: (1) creation of new substantive rules; (2) making regular committee work more efficient and improving transparency of trade policies; and (3) reforming dispute settlement.

Join CSIL and the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI) for a talk with Professor Jan Wouters, the founding Director of the Institute for International Law and of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies. Dr Wouters will consider:

  • Are the proposals balanced and effective?

  • Do they stand any chance or will securing consensus at the WTO be a very long shot?

  • Will the newly proposed substantive rules (i.e. on subsidies, state-owned enterprises, forced technology transfers, digital trade, different approach to special and differential treatment for developing countries) be acceptable to China, which is clearly targeted by them?

  • Will the proposals on transparency and committee work (i.e. improving subsidy notifications by creating a rebuttable presumption of serious prejudice in case of non-notification) appeal to the wider WTO membership?

  • And, last but not least, will the proposed changes to dispute settlement fly with the U.S., as they may go in a different direction compared to the latter’s views?

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Trading in Turbulent Times
Nov
2
3:30 PM15:30

Trading in Turbulent Times

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join CSIL and the Columbia Center on Sustainable Investment (CCSI) for a conversation with two CLS alumnae:

  • Kelly Ann Shaw ‘09
    Trade Counsel, US House Committee on Ways and Means
    Special Assistant to the President for International Trade, Investment and Development

  • Elissa Alben ‘02
    International Trade Counsel, US Senate Committee on Finance

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NAFTA to USMCA: A Panel Discussion
Nov
1
12:10 PM12:10

NAFTA to USMCA: A Panel Discussion

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 107 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join CSIL for lunch this Thursday, November 1 at 12:10 pm for a panel discussion about the USMCA (United States - Mexico - Canada - Agreement) and what it means for North America and the world. Speakers include Professor Petros Mavroidis of Columbia Law School, Professor Lisa Sachs of the Columbia Center on Sustainable Development, and Dr. Mislav Mataija of the European Commission's Legal Service.

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Twenty Years On: The International Criminal Court Today
Oct
31
12:10 PM12:10

Twenty Years On: The International Criminal Court Today

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

As the first permanent treaty-based court established to deal with genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression, celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has eleven situations under investigation, including in Uganda, Darfur, Sudan; the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and Georgia. What has the ICC accomplished, what is the court’s relevance in the early 21st century, and how has it responded to its critics? Join us for a conversation with ICC Judge and President-Elect Chile Eboe-Osuji about the court’s recent decisions and investigations, and the opportunities and challenges ahead.

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Should Human Rights Activists Disrupt Human Rights?
Oct
30
12:10 PM12:10

Should Human Rights Activists Disrupt Human Rights?

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 107 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

César Rodríguez-Garavito, the Executive Director of the Center for Law, Justice and Society (Dejusticia) and the Founder of the Program on Global Justice and Human Rights at the University of the Andes, will be giving a lunch talk on October 30, 2018.

César Rodríguez-Garavito will discuss critiques of the human rights field, and tactics for effectively disrupting human rights - and improving strategies for social justice - that draw on the insights of other areas, such as journalism, neuroscience, long-term thinking, and social psychology. For more information, see the attached flyer.

The talk will be moderated by Benjamin Hoffman, the Deputy Director of Columbia Law School’s Human Rights Clinic.

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Responding to the Global Crisis in Migrants' Rights with Felipe González Morales
Oct
17
12:10 PM12:10

Responding to the Global Crisis in Migrants' Rights with Felipe González Morales

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 104 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join CSIL and the Human Rights Institute for a lunch talk given by Felipe González Morales, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants.

An estimated 258 million people live outside their country of origin - including 68+ million displaced due to war, persecution, and environmental disaster. González Morales will discuss rights-based solutions to ensure access to justice for migrants and reflect on the opportunities and challenges facing the global community, based on a report to be presented to the UN General Assembly. The talk will be moderated by Maya Alkateb-Chami, Columbia Law School Human Rights Institute.

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The Remaking of Rwanda with Restorative Justice and Mediation
Oct
16
12:10 PM12:10

The Remaking of Rwanda with Restorative Justice and Mediation

  • Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall 105 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Coordinator of the Rwandan Justice Sector, Anastase Nabahire will be giving a lunchtime talk on Tuesday, October 16 in JG 105. Mr. Nabahire will not only explain the role of restorative justice and mediation in his country’s recovery from the 1994 genocide in the last quarter century, but also the expanded role that these processes will be used for interrupting the cycles of conflict and violence generated by cultural trauma. 

In addition, CSIL will be co-sponsoring a reception for Mr. Nabahire with the the Human Rights Institute and the Center for Institutional and Social Change on Monday, October 15 from 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM. There is a limited number of spots at this event. To attend, please email Caroline Golub by October 12 (cg3059@columbia.edu), briefly explaining why you're interested in attending the reception. Confirmations will be shared shortly thereafter.

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The Significance of the International Criminal Court: Celebrating the ICC’s 20th Birthday in the US
Apr
16
4:30 PM16:30

The Significance of the International Criminal Court: Celebrating the ICC’s 20th Birthday in the US

In celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute of the ICC, please join us for a discussion on the development and significance of the Court on transitional justice and accountability for mass atrocities. What are the major achievements of and challenges facing the ICC? Which cases will prove most pivotal to the Court’s growth and legitimacy? This conversation contributes to a broader effort to acknowledge this 20th anniversary throughout the US in 2018. Panelists will reflect on this moment of truth for the ICC through a panel discussion and audience Q&A. 

Panelists include:
Roy Lee, Executive Secretary to the International Criminal Court Conference
Lori Damrosch, Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy
Jelena Pia-Comella, Deputy Executive Director of the Coalition for the ICC (Global) 
Moderated by John Washburn, Convener of American NGO Coalition for the ICC 

Organized by American NGO Coalition for the International Criminal Court (AMICC), SIPA Human Rights and Humanitarian Policy Concentration, SIPA Human Rights Working Group, Columbia Society of International Law.

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CSIL Language Exchange Program
Feb
20
12:10 PM12:10

CSIL Language Exchange Program

We are happy to commence the 2017-2018 CSIL Language Exchange Program! Through the exchange, students will be grouped and placed in touch with each other based on the language they would like to practice and their level of fluency: groups will consists of both fluent speakers and students who are interested in practicing and improving that language.

Join us for a non-pizza lunch!

Not registered yet? Not a problem. The launch is intended to bring together students interested in participating in the exchange.

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International Clerkships 101
Jan
18
12:10 PM12:10

International Clerkships 101

Interested in clerking internationally but not sure how to when, where or how to apply? Not sure what an international clerkship even is? Join CSIL and the Office of Student Affairs on Thursday, January 18th 12:10 - 1:10 PM in JG 102A for an information session about international clerkships! 

A panel of faculty, administrators and former clerks (details below) will provide an overview of the nature of international clerkships, the resources available at CLS and how interested students might access such clerkships. The discussion will also cover the Columbia Law School Parker Fellowship at the International Court of Justice.

Panelists include:

  • Lori Damrosch – Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law and Diplomacy 
  • Adam Kolker – Assistant Dean for International and Comparative Law Programs
  • Subarkah Muhammad '19 – Former ICJ Clerk
  • Claire O’Connell ’16 – Former ICJ Clerk

Non-pizza lunch will be provided.

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CSIL 1L Summer Jobs Panel
Nov
9
12:10 PM12:10

CSIL 1L Summer Jobs Panel

1Ls and CSIL Members!

Join us on Thursday, November 9 in JG107 for the CSIL 1L Summer Jobs Panel! Roti Roll will be served. 

This is of particular value to 1Ls considering working abroad or in international law this summer. The panel will consist of upper year JD students discussing what they did during their 1L summer. Panelists held roles in the public and private sectors, in a variety of countries. 

This is a great opportunity to learn about the various opportunities available to you and to get an idea about timelines and the application process. There will also be a question period at the end. 

We're excited to see you there!

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European Counterterrorism Policy and Human Rights in the Trump Era
Nov
9
12:10 PM12:10

European Counterterrorism Policy and Human Rights in the Trump Era

In recent years, European countries have made significant changes to their domestic counter-terror laws and taken direct military action against Isis and other groups in the Middle East, North Africa, and the Sahel. Join us for a discussion on the extent to which European countries have adopted a US-style "war on terrorism" model, how far they continue to offer a different approach, and what impact the Trump presidency will have on transatlantic relations in counter-terrorism.

Anthony Dworkin is a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, working on human rights, democracy and justice, and is the author of the recent ECFR policy brief "Europe's New Counter-Terror Wars" (2016). He was formerly executive director of the Crimes of War Project.

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CSIL Faculty Lunch Series: Professor Katharina Pistor
Nov
8
12:10 PM12:10

CSIL Faculty Lunch Series: Professor Katharina Pistor

Join the Columbia Society of International Law for an intimate lunch with Professor Katharina Pistor. Professor Pistor is the Michael I. Sovern Professor of Law and Director of the Center on Global Legal Transformation. Her research and teaching spans corporate law, corporate governance, money and finance, property rights, and comparative law and legal institutions.

During the lunch, Professor Pistor will discuss her recent research on the transformation of sovereignty in the age of globalization.

The CSIL Faculty Lunch Series aims to provide students with an opportunity to connect with CLS’ international law faculty in an intimate setting. While we will do our best to accommodate everyone, please understand that space will be limited for each event and dues-paying members will get first priority. Please RSVP here. We will notify you shortly after to confirm your spot. Non-pizza lunch will be provided. 

This CSIL Faculty Lunch Series event is made possible by the generous sponsorship of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP.

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Resolving Controversy over Public Policy in the Annulment of International Arbitral Awards
Nov
2
12:10 PM12:10

Resolving Controversy over Public Policy in the Annulment of International Arbitral Awards

 

Please join the Columbia International Arbitration Association (CIAA) and the Columbia Society of International Law (CSIL) on November 2, 2017 in JG 107 for a lunchtime discussion with Leon Trakman of the issue ofhow to construe the public policy exception to the recognition and enforcement of arbitral awards under Article V(2)(b) of the New York Convention. Some argue that the exception ought to be construed restrictively, encompassing only the domestic public policies of signatory states. Others contend that it should be construed expansively to include transnational public policy considerations as well. Yet others worry that national courts invoking domestic public policy to annul international arbitration awards may do so partially and in deference to the state’s executive. Illustrating concern over the uncertain scope of domestic public policy is a growing number of controversial judicial rulings, including in the US and Russia, in which a domestic court in one jurisdiction annuls a foreign arbitration award on domestic public policy, while a court in another jurisdiction enforces it on diametrically opposed public policy grounds. The presentation will propose working principles of public policy to redress this judicial divergence in a strategic, effective and fair manner.

Leon Trakman is Professor of Contract and Arbitration Law and Past Dean of the Faculty of Law at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. The recipient of a doctorate from Harvard, he is the author of 10 books and over 100 articles in international journals. His academic appointments include, amongst others, Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of California (Davis), Visiting Professor at Wisconsin Law School, Tulane Law School and the University of Cape Town, Professor of Law at Dalhousie University and Bolton Visiting Professor at McGill University. He has served extensively as an international commercial arbitrator and as a panelist appointed by the US, Canadian, and Mexican Governments to decide antidumping, countervailing duty, and injury disputes under the NAFTA.

A *non-pizza lunch* will be served.

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